About your Search

20130101
20130131
SHOW
Today 41
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 119
MSNBCW 113
CNNW 103
CSPAN 76
MSNBC 66
FOXNEWS 63
CNBC 55
CNN 49
KGO (ABC) 44
CSPAN2 38
FBC 34
KNTV (NBC) 29
WRC (NBC) 29
WBAL (NBC) 26
CURRENT 24
WJLA (ABC) 23
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1014
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,015 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states seem to recognize the soviets in 1933 under roosevelt. then during the '30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus in trying to stop hitler. the anti-fascist forces globally and the commons party was -- as a result of that. but then during the war, after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide they will support the soviet union because, to bring the service can keep the soviets in the war. the soviets were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the service would think -- capitulates at the moment. the united states offer several things. the soviets make several demands. the united states promises matÉriel and has a hard time living there for a number of reasons. in the first couple of years. stalin said if you give us the airplanes and other equipment that we need, the united states tries to roosevelt makes an effort. other people are not as quite sincere in providing. the soviets second and, they wanted som
was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000 graduates this year. what are the others going to do? there are jobs available and good jobs available, but we have to first let them know what to expect upon graduation. second thing we have to do is make sure we continue to have the profession look like our society. two spots of the examples. hispanic lawyers, less than 4%. 15% of our society. african americans come 8% come away under-represented. what we are doing in that regard as we have minority scholarships and a program where we put minority students with federal judges and state judges. we have a diversity center, which are the only four missions of the
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
ever bless the united states of america. [applause] >> the united states marine band. my country tis of thee sweet land of liberty if thee i sing land where my fathers died lad of the pilgrim's pride from every mountain side let freedom ring ♪ let music sweel the beach and ring from all the trees sweet freedom songs let silence break the sound prolonged ♪ our father guide to thee father of liberty to thee we sing ♪ long may our land be bright with freedom's holy light protect us by the might great god, our king ♪ >> pwow. our next distinguished guest is the appellate issue will share with us where -- poet who will share with us words he has composed for this location. occasion. >> one today. one sun rose on us today kindles over our shores greeting the facves of the great lakes acrossng a simple truth the greatplains rooftops, aking upf under each one a story told by oiur silten gestures my face, your face millions of faces each one yawning to life crescendoing to our day the pencil yellow school buses, for it stands, oranges betting our praise. sobered trucks and heavy with
science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e.m. fields. we cannot continue to ignore this problem. it's that simple. continued in action -- especially since the american enterprise institute has confirmed 100 foreign-born workers with s.t.e.m. degrees create an average of 262 additional jobs for nativeborn workers. let me tell you, these countries would love to have the american educated ph.d's and other highly educated individuals return and boost their economies. not only from their acquired skills, but also by creating these new jobs as well.
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
city, defense secretary leon panetta announced the united states military will no longer ban women from serving on the front lines of war. and open up hundreds of thousands of fighting jobs for women service members. the decision reverses the 1994 rule that restricted women from combat roles, even though women frequently found themselves in direct combat in iran and in afghanistan. many fought and died there, in fact, those wars led to the deaths of 152 american service women. the defense secretary leon panetta today said that not everybody will become a combat soldier, but that everyone is entitled to a chance. >> i go on to bethesda to visit wounded warriors and i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of men and women in uniform. they serve the wounded and they die right next to each other. >> shepard: the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff recommended the move and the bipartisan group of lawmakers says it supports the lifting of the ban, but critics say they do have some concerns, including the republican congressman and
scattered around the hospital's different departments as well as in the intensive care units who have not been identified yet. it isn't a big number, the people waiting outside for news are desperate. >> it was the end of the summer holiday season in brazil. the last chance to party for many young people due back at school or work on monday. cnn, santa maria, brazil. >> we had a similar tragedy here in the u.s., a fire started at an overcrowded nightclub in rhode island and died. if you can believe it, that was 10 years ago. susan candiotti has a look back at that nightclub fire. >> reporter: in 2003, 100 people died at the station nightclub in west warwick rhode island, where the band great white was performing, pyrotechnics ignited sound proofing material, smoke filled the room, in 1990, arson was the cause of the happy land fire in new york, it killed 87 people. authorities said the bronx club was operating illegally, two years after it was ordered closed because of safety violations. in 1977 fire at the beverly hills supper club in south gate kentucky killed 165 people. among 2400
to risk the full faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid
homes. because of the demand in housing . all of a sudden into the congress of the united states of the says we are going to put the full faith and credit of the united states of america on a 90-day leash. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gent
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
and property. how did the united states rank? here now to break it down is san tr sandra smith from fox business network. the united states dropped to 10 from where it was. we have a full screen where we can show you the top ten countries. hong kong is number wivenlt drop it why? >> you are looking at what was behind the rankings. it was ruled law government and open market. economic freedom declines five straits years in undeveloped countries. only two countries have seen that. a lot of the problem out there has been regulations like the united states. that is number one through our decline. >> analyzing why the u.s. dropped kwef a quote from the editor ambassador terry miller who has no freedom slow down around the world on the lack of u.s. leadership. he goes on to say protectionism has resulted in higher costs and restrictions apply the u.s. still driving the u.s. economy. >> this is a big problem. big problem for driving businesses out of the united states. one of the most shocking things i thought was that europe and that office condition is narrowing the gaps to the united states
. looking at conflicts of the organization's and workspace united states, often not the most crucial to those on the ground and sometimes it is difficult to understand. those other questions that they ask. who can i trust? to can i not trust? sow developed a policy that is the question we have to ask what about the relationship of foreign fighters? what kind? overtime there is a pretty good relationship without chitin and i imagine they would point* to the relationship over time that they clashed repeatedly with millicent's and as a result he clashed with other taliban elements in south waziristan. stability of that organization we have to get down to the fine point* how he frames his politics. for. have aggressively do they target people in afghanistan? this is pretty obvious. he supported troops from afghanistan but that is not the case for every militant network fare pretty -- many criminal networks that fought other militant organizations. it is a key question for policy going forward have the pakistan restate looks at the organization's. it is important to us but not the i s i h
, talk to me after you got on the stage in front of the president of the united states and hundreds of thousands to sing the national anthem in 40-degree weather. until then, that particular bomb is bursting in air on the ridiculist. that's it for us. thanks for watching. "erin burnett out front" starts right now. >>> "outfront" next, weeks after newtown, another shooting at an american school as two gunmen open fire at a texas college. we go to houston for the latest. >>> plus the family of an american hostage murdered in algeria spoke out today. >>> beyonce's national anthem. what you may not have known about it. about it. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, a shooting at a texas campus. shots rang out at the lone star community college in houston today in what officials now are blaming on a fight between two people. it was pretty awful to watch. it was so much uncertainty today as we started to see just what those helicopter shots, people running, there were stretchers. no one was sure what was happeni
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the 1970's. so we had one to carry the injection and the other to carry the big spacecraft until somebody said we met. if we look at what we want to do, which is to get a man on the moon and bring him back, let's look at the settlements of this instead of a spacecraft to do everything. >> 100 years from now -- i'm just throwing a question and i will go back to this -- that you touched on something hundred, 200 years from now or we going to look back at the space program and say how primitive. in the 200 years, where to go from here from new york come to london, how advanced is this thing going to get? >> time will tell o
. >>> all right. the united states marine corps band is now going by the reviewing stand. the president is there with the co comb don't of the u.s. marine corps. now it's the marines. it's the marines turn. so you know what, let's pay homage. let's respect the united states marines. ♪ ♪ that is a beautiful shot. the u.s. marine corps being honored. now the chinese-american community center folk dance troupe from delaware, the home state of the vice president of the united states. we're getting a little different cultural -- this is a little cultural dancing. but who knew they were from delaware, these dancers have performed, by the way, not only here, but the kennedy center, the smithsonian, the wilmington brand opera house, play house theater, national theater. this is an excellent, excellent folk dance troupe. >> as you look close, you can see these people are working really hard as they're approaching. this is the tail end of their parade as they get to the reviewing stand so they're really working hard. >> they haven't had a lot of time to practice. the election ended, then the
for giving me the privilege of representing that beautiful and diverse city in the congress of the united states. each of us here today is truly a representative. a representative in the truest sense of the word. to represent the highest hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve, some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the signing of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bill, ringing the bill. and as she rang the bell she said, now we are free. it was quite an incredible moment. and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call a new birth of freedom. for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people. the ability and obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders. to carry forth the torch of progress. to reignite the american dream. this is who we ar
and it comes amid a bitter debate over gun control in the united states. just yesterday in his inaugural address, the president appeared to link the debate to the founding principles and the constitution. >> we have always understood that when times change, so must we. that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges. that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. >> "outfront" tonight, hogan gidley, republican strategist. michael waldman, former speech writer for president clinton and michael avlon. obviously that was a reference, a rather oblique one, to the gun control debate, but a reference it appeared to be. the fourth school shooting, though, in more than a month. nearly half the american people disapprove of what the president is doing on gun control. is it time now for less talk and more action from the president on gun control? >> well, you're right, that in that powerful speech yesterday, he used the words and the sentiments of the founders to argue for his agenda and one of the elements obliquely, though not exp
men and women side by side in combat would be distracting, harmful, and awkward for unit cohesion. >> i think people are being awfully cavalier about this restriction being lifted. combat is a life or death game. if we get this wrong, the loser dies. >> republican senators sounded alarm bells saying congress may have to put the brakes on the de deal, and family research groups weighed in. one asking how much national security is our president willing to forego to promote this kind of progressive feminism. not every republican feels this way. buck mckeon said he welcomes the announcement, and people on both sides of the aisle said it's totally normal if you speak dutch, hebrew, polish, or f finnish. in addition, there's the inescapable fact that in modern war fare, the lines are blurry. meaning troops in noncom bat roles can end up in combat. >> when i got to baghdad, my first foray out of the operating base, i hopped into the humvee and i asked the driver who he was, where he was from? i said, who are you? she leaned down and said, i'm amanda. i said, okay. >> tammy duckworth lost
, congressional republicans have held the full faith and credit of the united states of america hostage for political points and debates. instead of doing what congress has always done under both parties, allowing the government to pay the bills it has accrued. they decided to play a game of chicken with the global economy. reporter: paul ryan, we are told, is working on a budget plan that would balance within 10 years. it is expected that patty murray's idea of the budget will be quite different. but the bottom line is a lot of people who say we need the budget with this debt of $16 trillion are going, will be glad to get to the table and work on an actual budget speech you we will see how it turns out. mike emanuel, thank you very much be one a fox news weather alert. extreme winter weather is gripping parts of the south. arctic air and freezing rain expected from arkansas to the north carolina and south carolina area. dangerous driving conditions. up to a quarter inch of ice can accumulate. people in the upper midwest and northeast are wondering when the cold will end. another day of
personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation when you go from the first to the second. the first one, everybody's filled with hope. we can make c
discounts than we knoweth what to do with. now that's progressive. >>> how is the united states constitution like a banana peel? well, a certain group of people who are frequently unfunny keep slipping on it. that story is next. >>> this was the scene earlier today on the house floor. watch. >> we the people of the united states in order to form a more perfect union establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and to our posterity to ordain and establish this constitution for the united states of america. >> now, he did not write that himself. yes, it was constitution day on the floor of the house of representatives. read the constitution day. remember two years ago when republicans took over the house, john boehner became speaker for the first time, they decided to make a big show out of reading the constitution page by page on the floor of the house as one of their first acts? well, they apparently enjoyed that so much a couple of years ago when they did it the first time that t
weakened. 3m up 13%, united technologies up 12%. they are naturals to repeat their gains if not do better given strong asian exposure. 3m has been held back by a weak china. they can only improve from here after the tax bill. two well-run companies, perfect proxies for worldwide growth. 11% gains, even the most boring of stocks can generate returns. i think the same gain is in the cards for this year. cisco for all its flaws, still beat the dow by a percentage point. i can't see this company returning to the days of yore, that's not going to happen. but up 8 pr%, it can do that ag. i think it can return to the mid 20s where it closed today. what's with burke falling so far behind and an inferior pfizer going up at least historically. the pipeline needs improvement here or we'll see high single digits again. they will remain the order of the day if not the year until we hear about something that can produce multiple billions of dollars in the out years and i certainly don't see anything in merck's pipeline that can do that. verizon didn't help the cause. it's been such a good one. i think
first trip outside of the united states never made her flight home from turkey and her family says they are joining the search to find her. a bomb shell if the unsolved murder of jon benet, a grand jury now, we know, voted to indict her parents in that little girl's death well more than a decade ago but the prosecutors said no. the details on that coming up. iran claims they have done something that the united states did in 1950 and they very excited. they sent a monkey into space. the white house doesn't boy it. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b" today. but there is breaking news, first from fox at 3:00, in new york city, lawmakers from both parties today unveiled the sweeping immigration overhaul with a plan that gives 11 million illegal immigrants a pass to citizenship. the proposal combines calls for tighter board security with calls to allow illegal immigrants to stay in the united states. the immigrants would be allowed to apply for resident status but only after new border enforcement measures are firmly in place. the sundays laid owe the p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,015 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)